Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Selling animal pelts???

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Selling animal pelts???

    Can anyone give me any direction as to people/dealers who may buy animal pelts in MA/VT/NH area. I heard rumor you can get some ok money selling pelts and with predator season upon us I wouldn't mind some info on any dealers/buyers.

    Any info is appreciated...Thanks.MachineGun Beerchug

    One of my favorite clothing patterns is camouflage. Because when you're in the woods it makes you blend in. But when you're not it does just the opposite. It's like hey, there's an asshole.

  • #2
    Tacoma..I good friend of mine is a trapper....and he sells his furs in PA. they have a big thing there come early spring or late winter...he gets the best price there...and it all depends how the pelts are cleaned and any holes....he told me the dealers here give you peanuts....plus not many at all around here...

    But you have to have a lot of fur to make it wild to go to PA ...

    Al

    Comment


    • #3
      A co-worker of mine is a trapper as well, he sells his pelts to a company that makes hats and capes, i'll see if he is willing to share info.

      Comment


      • #4
        lett me know becuase i would be interested as well. PM me with any info

        Comment


        • #5
          I am a fur buyer in southern Vermont, but do not like to buy shot animals as a general rule, only trapped, the handling on varmint hunter pelts makes the pelts almost unusable as 99% of the hunters are hunters and not trappers and do not know how to handle a pelt correctly.

          NAFA has auctions and collections throughout the season, as does Fur Harvesters and other global fur houses.

          Most state trappers associations have at least one auction and sale a year, the season is starting to wind down with last sales usally in march.

          I'd recommend contacting and joining your State's trapping group, http://www.masstrappers.com/links.html, and partner up with an experienced fur handler/ trapper as a badly handled fur will not only take up time and effort but quite often won't sell at all.

          Proper handling starts with skinning to industry current standards and stretching to proper size and dimensions, easy enough to learn, of great importance pehaps is knowing what regulations need to be met to sell or export furs from state to state, some states require sealing, others require you have a furbuyers license, still others require nothing at all!

          When looking at fur prices in FFG or online keep in mind that they are at best average prices FOR WHAT SOLD, and do not reflect gunshot varmint hunted pelts, and do not take into consideration the pelts that were not bought at all.

          after skinning a shot critter I sew the bullet hole edge to edge with fishing line, flesh it , then wash the pelts in a washing machine on delicates for that purpose with kids shampoo, no more tangles works great, then air dry and brush out all burrs and junk, and stretch to proper size. the effort made in proper handling is seen at the auctions or fur house.

          There is also small country buyers like Lewis Hollow trapping in Petersburgh, NY, Ron runs a great trapping shop and buys fur and deer hides as the market allows.

          Should you ship to NAFA or FHA, oyu will be asked to join, and will be charged a commission, and drumming fees, etc so while you might get $20 gross from a coyote well handled you might only see $6 of that in pocket if it sells at all....if it doesn't sell you do not get it back.

          Selling to a buyer in Warwick, NY, Manchester, VT, or Petersburgh, NY might look like less but $10 handed to you over the counter beats a coyote pelt sitting in Canada that you can't get back and can't sell til maybe next year when they finally move it for 2 bucks for you!
          LOL.

          A good place to get help on learning fur handling is Traps 4 Kids, http://www.traps4kids.com/

          it is geared towards kids but everyone will learn something there. They also have a VERY good 4 tape course of instruction, literally hundreds of the countries best trappers on tape showing hands on work, and all 4 hours or more including shipping was $20 last I knew.....pretty great deal.
          http://flinterhunting.proboards.com/index.cgi

          new hunting board

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks Simon. That was very informative and interesting. Just out of curiosity, how small a "lot" will the fur buyers bother with. I would think that they are not very interested in one or two pelts? Or am I wrong? Notsure Thanks1
            Last edited by thortum; 01-05-2009, 10:27 AM.
            Live life honestly-lies are hard to remember

            Comment


            • #7
              What kind of pelts are you trying to sell? My buddy who does some deer butchering told me today that he gets about $5 per deer hide. He has to bring them to New York though. I guess it's worth it when you have 100 or so hides.
              "The sportsman lives his life vicariously. For he secretly yearns to have lived before, in a simpler time. A time when his love for the land, water, fish and wildlife would be more than just part of his life. It would be his state of mind." Author, Jim SlinskyFishing1

              Comment


              • #8
                If Anyone Shoots Squirrels Give Me The Pelts, I Wanna Make A Hat

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by thortum
                  Thanks Simon. That was very informative and interesting. Just out of curiosity, how small a "lot" will the fur buyers bother with. I would think that they are not very interested in one or two pelts? Or am I wrong? Notsure Thanks1
                  Local furbuyers will take 1 or 1,000 if they are worthy of the name.

                  Most make an effort to buy whatever they can provided it is handled correctly, I don't know of any state that does not require everyne dealing in furs to be a licensed fur buyer, and that is incentive to do as much business as possible.

                  Also, if you are bringing your furs to a buyer, ASK what you can do better...it is in the buyer's best interest to get the best fur he can too! When you make money on better handled furs he makes money on better handled furs.

                  For instance, several people have brought in big piles of furs this last week to me, and they are stretched well but the ears on the K9s and bobcats are not handled correctly, the cartilage should be removed when skinning, it is VERY easy to do and I am happy to show everyone how to do it so they aren't handing me a big bag full of stinking fur slipping furs then getting mad at the "low price" offered.

                  If I can smell the rot , you are not getting top dollar, anywhere, period, also, once the furs are stretched and dried properly it is best to remove them from your stretchers and freeze them until selling, it stops pretty much all chances of slippage, but on fur that is slipping, like those rotten ears, nothing will reverse fur slip.

                  Do they use ears in the fur trade? NO. But when a pile of rotting and stinking fur is on the table there is simply no way a top lot offer is going to happen.

                  The least that should be done for coyote or fox is that all burrs and knots, tangles and debris be brushed out of the hide before skinning, these burrs and etc sticking in the fur will cause your fleshing knife to snag when fleshing and more often than not make a hole or at the least do some sort of damage.

                  Carry toilet paper or paper towels with you and stuff it int eh bullet hole to stop as much blood from getting on the fur as possible, keep in mind you are already lsoing money shooting it, might as well try to save what you can!

                  then; Brush them out with a dog comb, a stiff wire one to start then a softer brush, then skin them ( removing ear cartilage) and flesh them, you don't HAVE TO wash them, but it will bring more money 9 times out of 10.

                  board them to the right size and on the correct stretchers and air dry them making wure to turn them before 100% dry, as they won't turn well for you. once totally dry, and that means dry like paper, remove them from your stretchers and roll fur side out and freeze in a plastic bag until sale time.

                  the 9th fur sale today from FHA was top Beaver $42, Muskrat $6.90, Red fox $38 Grey fox $37 and coon sold almost not at all....so far...

                  Also, the Ballston Spa NY 1/3 fur sale had 21 coyote offered, the average was $14+ and top was $21.

                  wouldn't take long to buy a new bow, trolling motor, shotgun,etc at those prices.
                  http://flinterhunting.proboards.com/index.cgi

                  new hunting board

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Simon G...thanks, very informational!

                    One of my favorite clothing patterns is camouflage. Because when you're in the woods it makes you blend in. But when you're not it does just the opposite. It's like hey, there's an asshole.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Simon..that was a great post..very informative....as I said a buddy of mine is a trapper....and I have watched him flesh pelts on the fleshing board...lot of work to me..lol...
                      He has been to all the trapper gatherings around NE and also the one in PA...He got 3 nice river otters and sent them to a guy in Minnesotta and had a hat made...very cool hat....

                      He is retired fireman and all he does is trap for the whole season....but he hates the MA rules on trapping....but he makes good money at the end....

                      And your right..he does keep the furs in a freezer..nothing like the smell of a fleshing room...lol....and the jugs of scent he has...

                      AL

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        thank you, I am glad it was helpful, I was dearly afraid of coming off as a know it all fur nut.

                        to be honest? The best use of shot furs and hobby trapped furs is to make them into something for yourself, a pair of beaver fur mittens are hard to beat when out ice fishing or snowshoeing behind beagles, or out getting the mail for that matter.

                        line a hat with bunny and you will be a happy camper.

                        I don't know the fashion statement that Squirrel Fur golf club covers will make but I bet they are pretty much a one of a kind thing.
                        http://flinterhunting.proboards.com/index.cgi

                        new hunting board

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by tacoma
                          Can anyone give me any direction as to people/dealers who may buy animal pelts in MA/VT/NH area. I heard rumor you can get some ok money selling pelts and with predator season upon us I wouldn't mind some info on any dealers/buyers.

                          Any info is appreciated...Thanks.MachineGun Beerchug
                          What money you could get Tacoma is going to be very little the rest of the year and next year too, the NAFA sale last monday was a bust, very little sold, only 30% of the offered eastern coyote was bid on and sold, and that averaged $24, the only wild fur that sold out that i had in there was ermine and muskrat, beaver didn't sell and what did was for little money, ranch mink sets the price and it was unimpressive.

                          China was the major buyer, again,...and the weak russian rubel and russian economy really has prices down.

                          moral is? shoot all you want but to get the most return either hunt for fun or use the hides yourself, hats, gloves, etc.

                          I advise everyone to get out there and trap next year, the weak prices will have most trappers focusing on only a few species and overall low prices will have many trappers staying home or trapping the west for higher prices, this will mean a surge in furbearers, more coyotes, fisher, ermine, fox, coon, bobcat, etc, which is a great time to learn to trap...lots of critters, not much competition, when the prices tank its time to get the traps out.
                          http://flinterhunting.proboards.com/index.cgi

                          new hunting board

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X